St Paul's Catacombs

The Maltese Islands are rich in Late Roman and Byzantine burial sites. St Paul's Catacombs are a typical complex of interconnected, underground Roman cemeteries that were in use up to the 4th century AD.
They are located on the outskirts of the old Roman capital of Melitae (today's Mdina). Roman law prohibited burials within the city. This is the largest burial complex in the area and comprises a large number of catacombs.

St Paul's Catacombs represent the earliest archaeological evidence of Christianity in Malta. They have been called after St Paul because of their vicinity to St Paul's church and grotto. They were cleared up and investigated in 1894 by Dr A. A. Carina, the pioneer of Christian archaeology in Malta.

These Maltese catacombs, when compared with those of Rome, Sicily and North Africa, are somewhat smaller, but they have a wider variety and richness of tomb architecture. St Paul's Catacombs were the result of an indigenous development which was barely influenced by similar overseas traditions.

An imposing hall acts as the centre of St Paul's Catacombs. Passages lead off from it in several directions into a bewildering series of tomb galleries. The few surviving murals, despite their fragmentary state, are of considerable interest since they constitute the only surviving evidence on the Islands of paintings from the Late Roman and early medieval periods.

Among the most interesting features of St Paul's Catacombs are the circular tables which are set in a low platform with sloping sides and appear to resemble a reclining, circular couch. Both table and couch are hewn out in one piece forming a single architectural unit within an apsed recess.

They were probably used to host commemorative meals during the annual festival of the dead when the rites of burials were renewed. These meals were intended to bring living members of a family close to their dead.

On  our Outing.

First we went to St Paul's Catacombs where we saw the hall where the people used to pray and eat together.  We then went to see the place where they used to bury their dead.  We also saw chambers where a whole family used to be buried with the babies in a small hole in the wall next to the parents.  Another interesting feature of the tombs was a semi-circular hole on one side where the head used to be placed.  After that the guide showed us some written remains on the wall in red, where the Christians used to write the names of the people buried.  This was a memorable experience and one to remember.

THE MAIN HALL AT ST PAUL'S CATACOMBS

FUNERARY TRICLINUM.  THIS IS WHERE THE ROMANS CELEBRATED MEALS TO COMMEMORATE THE DEAD.

CLOSE UP OF A FUNERARY TRICLINUM

TOMB THAT WAS USED TO BURY INFANTS

THIS TOMB WOULD HAVE TAKEN LONGER TO BE CONSTRUCTED

IT IS LIKE A MAZE

DETAILED PLAN OF ST PAUL'S CATACOMBS